Archive for March, 2016

Julie Giroux – Symphony No. 4, “Bookmarks from Japan” – Movement 6: Hakone (Performed by Ray E. Cramer and the Musashino Academy Wind Ensemble)

This is the final movement of the piece, and probably the most difficult because of it’s tempo, odd time changes, and purely technical passages. Nonetheless, it’s going to be a whole lot of fun to play (once I get it into my fingers). I’m looking forward to performing the whole symphony in April.

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Julie Giroux – Symphony No. 4, “Bookmarks from Japan” – Movement 5: Evening Snow at Kambara (Performed by Ray E. Cramer and the Musashino Academy Wind Ensemble)

Julie Giroux – Symphony No. 4, “Bookmarks from Japan” – Movement 4: Kinryu-zan Sensōji (Performed by Ray E. Cramer and the Musashino Academy Wind Ensemble)

Movement 4, called “Thunder Gate” after an ancient Buddhist temple in the heart of Tokyo, is a powerful movement with driving percussion and BIG brass sections.

Julie Giroux – Symphony No. 4, “Bookmarks from Japan” – Movement 3: The Great Wave Off Kanagawa (Performed by Ray E. Cramer and the Musashino Academy Wind Ensemble)

We haven’t touched this movement yet in rehearsals, but it looks to be pretty tricky, with several time signature changes, and parts that are largely exposed and individualized for each section.

Julie Giroux – Symphony No. 4, “Bookmarks from Japan” – Movement 2: Nihonbashi (Performed by Ray E. Cramer and the Musashino Academy Wind Ensemble)

Movement 2 is a really fun movement to play. Meant to depict a bustling market on a bridge in early Tokyo, it has the same folksy feel as Percy Grainger’s music, only with a Japanese, rather than English, influence.

Julie Giroux – Symphony No. 4, “Bookmarks from Japan” – Movement 1: Fuji-San (Performed by Ray E. Cramer and the Musashino Academy Wind Ensemble)

It’s spring break, so I didn’t have wind ensemble rehearsal tonight. If I had, we would have spent some time working on this wind symphony by Julie Giroux, which I’m going to share over the next few days (the best recording I could find of it on YouTube splits it up by movement). My favorite part of this movement is actually a part I don’t play. At 1:26, after all of the build-up in the horns, trumpets, and percussion, they fall away to let a beautiful melody from the trombones and baritones come through. I wish that I could play it too, but it still gives me chills just to listen to.

DVBBS – Love & Lies

I’ve been listening to a lot of music of this genre (EDM, and specifically some hardstyle, like this track), for reasons that I’ll explain in a future post. Anyway, I’m not sure why I haven’t been posting all the music I’ve been listening to. I should do that…